August 4th, 2014
digitalista
June 28th, 2014
digitalista
October 11th, 2012
digitalista

juliefredrickson:

I really should preface every single pitch I do with this video. I promise it will be the best three minutes of your life if you working in marketing, media or start up land

This is absolutely hilarious.

November 14th, 2011
digitalista
A Word on Google+
I have been sitting on this post for a week trying to wrap my head around the launch of brand pages on Google+, particularly for luxury brands.  I actually wrote a REALLY long post about demos, usability, etc- but instead of posting it here I think I am going to use it for my real job- you know the one that pays me?
Here is the truncated version:
PROS:
1. SEARCH : Google has created a social network that perfectly optimizes it’s shared content to fit into their secret algorithm.  No matter what twitter or facebook does, they will most likely sit second fiddle to Google+ content.  This is kind of a sneaky play to push brands onto this platform- but brands can leverage this.  Take a look at your paid search account and your organic rankings- are there terms that are really important to you that you want to rank higher or pay less for?  Fill up that Google+ brand page with content suited to those areas and see if you make an impact.  My bet is yes.
CONS:
1. Your audience isn’t there.  And even if they were, there aren’t any tools to see that. 
2. Even if you wanted to build a community, there aren’t any tools to do so
3. You can only have one community manager- I recommend setting up a dummy gmail account & share it out to those who are managing.  This is ghetto, but it’s better than the alternative.
4. Currently there are about 40 million users of G+, but it’s somewhat difficult to see what percentage of them are active- judging by my page, I am going to guess that is a pretty small %- and I am fairly certain they are dudes, nerdy dudes who work for places you see advertising in the airport and you have no idea what they actually do because it’s just a picture of a child running through a field of flowers with their logo. 
That’s all I can muster.  
Oh, one more thing to all these people writing arcticles about Google+ “beating" or "killing" Facebook:   At MySpace’s height they were attracting 125 million users and Friendster has about 115 million users.  Facebook has over 800 million active users right now.  There has been NOTHING like this before.  My 82 year old grandmother is on Facebook.  My guess is that Facebook isn’t going anywhere for a while.

A Word on Google+

I have been sitting on this post for a week trying to wrap my head around the launch of brand pages on Google+, particularly for luxury brands.  I actually wrote a REALLY long post about demos, usability, etc- but instead of posting it here I think I am going to use it for my real job- you know the one that pays me?

Here is the truncated version:

PROS:

1. SEARCH : Google has created a social network that perfectly optimizes it’s shared content to fit into their secret algorithm.  No matter what twitter or facebook does, they will most likely sit second fiddle to Google+ content.  This is kind of a sneaky play to push brands onto this platform- but brands can leverage this.  Take a look at your paid search account and your organic rankings- are there terms that are really important to you that you want to rank higher or pay less for?  Fill up that Google+ brand page with content suited to those areas and see if you make an impact.  My bet is yes.

CONS:

1. Your audience isn’t there.  And even if they were, there aren’t any tools to see that. 

2. Even if you wanted to build a community, there aren’t any tools to do so

3. You can only have one community manager- I recommend setting up a dummy gmail account & share it out to those who are managing.  This is ghetto, but it’s better than the alternative.

4. Currently there are about 40 million users of G+, but it’s somewhat difficult to see what percentage of them are active- judging by my page, I am going to guess that is a pretty small %- and I am fairly certain they are dudes, nerdy dudes who work for places you see advertising in the airport and you have no idea what they actually do because it’s just a picture of a child running through a field of flowers with their logo. 

That’s all I can muster.  

Oh, one more thing to all these people writing arcticles about Google+ “beating" or "killing" Facebook:   At MySpace’s height they were attracting 125 million users and Friendster has about 115 million users.  Facebook has over 800 million active users right now.  There has been NOTHING like this before.  My 82 year old grandmother is on Facebook.  My guess is that Facebook isn’t going anywhere for a while.


November 2nd, 2011
digitalista
I think Jamie Beck from From Me To You is doing some really groundbreaking stuff with visuals for brands.  These assets are obviously Tumblr gold- just look at the notes on her posts and you will know why, but more interestingly these could be used as creative for extremely compelling banner campaigns in digital display advertising.
To serve a rich media ad unit with video and interactivity requires a big budget.  There is a premium on ad serving, a premium in creative services and sometimes a premium on the ad space itself even if only to accommodate a large piece of real estate.  If you run a Flash banner, there is a whole bunch of people on iPads and other apple devices that will not see it, though the ad serving won’t have the same premium as a rich media unit.  
That all said, rotating GIFs require no additional premiums in ad serving or otherwise and you still get the visibility and movement.  The only hurdle you would face is the requirement from publishers that the rotation stops after 3 times around, this is to avoid annoying the crap out of their audiences because a traditional rotating GIF actually is very abrupt and annoying.  If you look at the elegant subtleties in the image above, I think a brand would have a solid argument to go to their publishing partners for special dispensation on the maximum rotation.  This animation is charming, interesting and delicate- but certainly not annoying.
I also love the idea of using this onsite for brands.  Gilt Taste has done a lovely job of incorporating this movement/aesthetic into the silo pages of their site- but they are being served as mp4s, not GIFs.  This doesn’t render on my iPhone- but it doesn’t matter because they have a kickass mobile site.  Anyway, check them out, but look carefully they are really subtle:
Produce
Beverages
Wine
Pantry
Seafood
Meat

I think Jamie Beck from From Me To You is doing some really groundbreaking stuff with visuals for brands.  These assets are obviously Tumblr gold- just look at the notes on her posts and you will know why, but more interestingly these could be used as creative for extremely compelling banner campaigns in digital display advertising.

To serve a rich media ad unit with video and interactivity requires a big budget.  There is a premium on ad serving, a premium in creative services and sometimes a premium on the ad space itself even if only to accommodate a large piece of real estate.  If you run a Flash banner, there is a whole bunch of people on iPads and other apple devices that will not see it, though the ad serving won’t have the same premium as a rich media unit.  

That all said, rotating GIFs require no additional premiums in ad serving or otherwise and you still get the visibility and movement.  The only hurdle you would face is the requirement from publishers that the rotation stops after 3 times around, this is to avoid annoying the crap out of their audiences because a traditional rotating GIF actually is very abrupt and annoying.  If you look at the elegant subtleties in the image above, I think a brand would have a solid argument to go to their publishing partners for special dispensation on the maximum rotation.  This animation is charming, interesting and delicate- but certainly not annoying.

I also love the idea of using this onsite for brands.  Gilt Taste has done a lovely job of incorporating this movement/aesthetic into the silo pages of their site- but they are being served as mp4s, not GIFs.  This doesn’t render on my iPhone- but it doesn’t matter because they have a kickass mobile site.  Anyway, check them out, but look carefully they are really subtle:

Produce

Beverages

Wine

Pantry

Seafood

Meat

Reblogged from Ann Street Studio
October 20th, 2011
digitalista

This presentation by Mary Meeker of KPCB was absolutely fabulous to read and has SO many important facts, data & trends that every digital marketer should be aware of.  The summary of this deck is below and sourced from KPCB’s site:

This fact-packed presentation compiled by KPCB partner Mary Meeker explores and examines the significant trends shaping the Internet today. Backed by hard data and decades of technology analysis, Mary posits that the mobile revolution is still in its infancy and poised for tremendous growth. Her presentation also zeroes in on the newest breakout trends driving e-commerce, including the rejuvenating effects of local commerce, the global race to adopt mobile devices and apps, and the latest innovations in online payments. The evolving social space comes under Mary’s scrutiny as well. She observes that social networking is proving to be not just a powerful engagement model, but also a pervasive new wave of opportunity that spans the online experience. View the full presentation for a look at the digital trends that surround us in today’s increasingly mobile, social world.

October 11th, 2011
digitalista

SO proud of our team and our amazing clients at kate spade new york!  We were just ranked with “Genius” status on the L2 Digital IQ Index second behind Burberry and out of 50 of the top fashion brands in the world. 

September 15th, 2011
digitalista

Really impressed with the email marketing team at Pottery Barn Kids right now.  Timely, endearing and valuable- all the tenets for a successful email drop. 

July 31st, 2011
digitalista

A Word on Community Managers…

We were recently invited to a private event in Newport, RI by Conde Nast to speak to a select group of CEOs, who have audience targets in the high household income realm, about social media. Not only was it absolutely fabulous (the photo below is the beach cottage we stayed in- sicknasty), but it inspired me to write this post.

Out of that entire group of people, only one CEO seemed to really get digital media. The truth is that these brands represented a microcosm of the luxury industry at large, the more brands I meet, the more I realize how misguided and behind they are not only in terms of social, but in digital marketing in general. Social media is the voice of your brand. The analogy I use a lot is making social media analogous with a press conference, would you have a PR assistant or an intern get up and speak on behalf of your brand at a press conference? The answer is no. So why do most brands relegate social media community management to the likes of interns or PR assistants? Or throw it on the plate of someone who already has a full time job within the brand? These are HUGE mistakes. There are exceptions to this of course, the “legendary” social media brands winning awards & doing it right. The truth is that they are just using the tools correctly, not doing anything mind-blowing with them. Yet they are heralded as experts because everyone else is SO far behind and it’s embarrassing because it’s really not that hard. It’s ego & fear, pure & & simple. Simply put, it’s all about community managers. They should be among the most highly paid people in your organization. Let that sink in a moment. Now, that does not mean that this person should become the outward face of your brand. In fact, I strongly disagree with putting a face to your brand unless your brand has a face already and it’s integral to your brand message. Ever think of what Oscar de la Renta will do if they lose Erika Bearman? They would be completely fucked. She is Oscar PR Girl and her face is everywhere. Most of their posts are photos of her in a mirror, it’s almost like she is a personal style blogger.

That is why DKNY has played it really smart, if they need to slot someone different into that role, they can. She has a hell of a challenge filling those stilettos, but the persona allows for it 100%. I would also love to take a moment to discuss this “PR Girl” thing brands are doing. First of all DKNY was the first one to do this- everyone else nicked that idea. Secondly, unless you have a supremely dedicated PR director that has the ability to run your PR- which is a FULL time job- and be able to manage your social media- which is also a FULL time job- do not put this on your head of PR. These two women are exceptional and are not the norm, nor should they be. A community manager needs to live and breathe your brand and allowed access to every single little nook and cranny, they can accomplish this without being in your PR department. They need to be given an allowance to spend freely, be given a wardrobe stipend and a clear strategy as to what living your brand persona is all about. They need to live the lifestyle your brand has created all these years through analog mediums. Instead of a static photograph in a magazine or a singular video for a commercial, you have a living breathing medium that brands insist on trafficking the same assets to as before. If you don’t have a brand persona, get one. Post haste. Before you even start TALKING about hiring a community manager, you have to know who you are as a brand. Further more, if you are still in the mindset that every tweet needs to be approved by anyone other than your community manager, do not pass Go and do not collect $200. You are in the stone age and aren’t ready for social media. Additionally, don’t bother to hire a CM if you don’t have the resources to build a community large enough to justify the investment of that hire. If you don’t know how to build a community faster than you are organically, you need to hire me. You need awareness marketing. That is the beginning of all paths to conversion, but that is another blog post. 

June 22nd, 2011
digitalista
May 10th, 2011
digitalista

One day in the not so distant future, there will be no such thing as a “digital marketer”.

We will all be “marketers” and everyone else will be OUT OF A JOB.

April 27th, 2011
digitalista

A Day In The Life of a Digital Marketer 

(particularly in the luxury fashion industry)

March 28th, 2011
digitalista

Attention fashion publishers of the old school print world: you are lame.

Just to give this some context- nymag.com has 1.8mm unique visitors and a more direct competitor, Refinery29.com, has 200K unique visitors (really the same as vogue.com).  I am working on a media plan for a big luxury fashion client and I am astonished at the lack of REACH on vogue.com, style.com and elle.com.  No wonder they are clinging to Comscore numbers- they are still so fluffed up based on garbage data, it’s making them look more compelling than they really are.  

Also of note, if you look at Vogue.com on Quantcast it’s showing on 5k unique visitors, but they aren’t “Quantified”, so let’s throw them a bone with the compete.com numbers.  

When vogue.com launched in Sept. 2010, they sold a 5 way split sponsorship owning the site for well into six figures through the remainder of the year.  So, let’s assume they went on the low end and only dropped $250K per sponsorship, using the data on this chart and dividing by 5 for a 20% SOV- that means those jabroni brands basically had an eCPM of $763.59.  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

Anna may not know how to run a website, but she sure knows how to make money from luxury.  I know the names of the brands who bought this sponsorship, but more interestingly- do you?  If you do, then the cost was worth it, but I would bet my last dollar you have no idea.  Probably because you read Vogue’s content on Tumblr and not on their actual site.

Anna… call me baby.

(stats via compete.com)

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momma of 3 boys, digital marketer, owner of RJK Project & adventure collector.

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